Preview: The 2013 Fujifilm X-E2

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The Fujifilm X-E2 is a welcome update to last year’s popular X-E1. The camera takes the innards of the X100s and puts them in an X-mount body; it isn’t the X-Pro2 that a lot of users were hoping for, but it’s a significant enough update – for those who had issues with AF speed at least – to warrant serious consideration. In fact, I was sent a list of 61 improvements the X-E2 carries; some new to the camera, some inherited from the X-M1 and others from the X100s. I personally have had a rather inconsistent experience with Fujifilm products; on one hand, I absolutely love their films – Acros is my mainstay in all formats – but was left highly expectant and then disappointed by several cameras, first the original X100, then the X-Pro1, the XF1 and finally the X20. These are cameras I wanted to love, but found lacking in several areas; ultimately, I landed up with M4/3 as my compact system choice due to maturity of cameras and lenses. Many have asked why I don’t seriously consider the X system; I was offered a pre-production prototype by Fujifilm Malaysia, and I cleared a few days in the schedule to seriously revisit the system.

Note: the camera’s firmware is not final, so there will be no evaluation of image quality yet, or full size files or crops. Also bear in mind that some of the observations may change after final firmware. Most of the images in this review are mostly SOOC JPEG; a few have minor color corrections and all B&W images were converted from colour source files.There are also more samples in this Flickr set.

I also have the X-Q1 here; I just haven’t had time to shoot with it yet.

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The biggest changes are around the sensor and focusing: the X-E2 uses the X100s’ 16MP X-Trans II CMOS which has phase detect AF photosites on chip. As we know, the X-Trans layout uses a different colour filter array and interpolation method to arrive at the final image, which supposedly increases image quality and prevents moire. I can agree with the latter, since I simply didn’t see any during the test period of this or any of the other X-Trans cameras I’ve shot; however, I’m still stymied by workflow issues when it comes to image quality comparisons: sadly, ACR results are mediocre at best. However, if I use another converter, lack of familiarity is going to prevent me from obtaining optimal results from any camera; beyond that, the whole workflow is significantly slower. Let’s park this issue for now and hope that Adobe eventually gets the demosaicing algorithm right – or that Fuji shares it with them. It would seem like an obvious business decision given the number of X-system users out there; I saw a surprising number in my recent European workshops.

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Back to focusing. One of my biggest issues with the early cameras was focusing speed; it was downright slow and worse still, imprecise. Subsequent firmware updates have improved that, but not to the point that I was confident of the camera nailing the target in the same way the OM-D does; I’m pleased to say that the X-E2 fixes this. It still isn’t as fast as the E-M5 (let alone the E-M1); to be honest I think it sits on the borderline of being sufficient. There were a lot of situations in which the camera just felt laggy – mostly due to an initial hesitation before the lens kicked in; I am pretty sure this is down to the notchy shutter button – it feels like it has three positions, with the first detent after taking up initial slack (usually activating AF on other cameras) doing nothing. Despite shooting with it intensively for several days, it still felt slow to me. Odd, because this was not the case at all with my friend’s X100s.

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There is a ‘high performance mode’ buried in the menus that increases focusing speed slightly, but it appears to freeze the live view in order to do so – this is a big no-no in my book because it means you have no visibility of critical action, making it very difficult to time shots. There’s also a pre-AF function that continually drives the lens while the camera is on to reduce AF times further; it works but is audible and will chew through batteries very quickly indeed; typical performance was ~200-250 images with very conservative use, and powering off the camera between images. In addition to focus peaking, Fuji have added the magnified (2.5x) digital split image simulation/ ‘rangefinder’ to the MF assist options (inherited from the X100s); it works reasonably well, but doesn’t have enough horizontal displacement to be truly effective – fortunately, that’s a simple firmware fix. Fuji claims to have a new AF-C tracking mode, which works at 3fps; it still lags behind the E-M1, let alone a DSLR.

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Incidentally, continuous frame rate also increase from 5.6fps to 7fps, though there is of course single, locked AF only at this speed. Live view also blacks out between frames, making tracking subjects a little challenging; this would work better with the hybrid optical finder of the X-Pro. The buffer is for 37 JPEG images; RAW is of course less and will depend on your card speed. The now-obligatory wifi connectivity has been added, which allows for image transfer to smartphones and tablets via a free app; what I still don’t understand is why none of the camera makers – especially those who target these cameras at professional audiences – will make a wifi connection that allows for serious tethered shooting with raw files etc. for proper photography, not just social media. A wasted opportunity, if you ask me – especially since the hardware is already in place. Fuji are by no means the only guilty party – they can join the ranks of Olympus and Canon. I’d rather not have the feature at all if it isn’t useful.

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Enough of specs: we’re all aware that cameras passed the point of sufficiency some time ago. Haptics and handling are far more important criteria determining whether a camera stays with you and becomes a partner or a hinderance. The X-E2 is a mix of good and bad. I admit that I am not familiar enough with the Fuji system to comment extensively on handling compared to the other models in the lineup; I’ll be approaching this from the viewpoint of a prospective new user.

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Firstly, though the body is ostensibly magnesium, it lacks the solid feel of the X100s. The grip shape deserves praise, however: though it’s a flat and boxy camera, your fingers are guided into a comfortable shooting position that places all of the buttons and dials easily to hand. A thumb catch on the back prevents the camera from twisting out of your hand, though the AF-L and AE-L buttons are slippery, poorly located and difficult to press without your grip slipping and the weight transferring to your lens hand. Again, the shutter button needs work. The threaded release is great, but the button itself is far too notchy and seems to have three positions (there are really only two) – the feel of this one single control can make a big difference to the responsiveness of the camera, and your ability to release it without shake. The X-E2′s button is both too notchy and too firm at the break point. The large number of customisable buttons should also be commended; along with the Q button to easily access a grid of core settings, though the self timer seems oddly buried in the main menu and not part of the drive options – Fuji, people actually use this to reduce vibration for tripod work, not just self portraits. The LCD has also increased in size to 3″, up from 2.5″ for the X-E1.

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Also deserving of praise is the ability to configure them camera before power on – at least with fixed aperture lenses – you can set aperture, shutter speed and exposure compensation from the physical dials alone, something that few cameras can match. And by using combinations of the A(uto) positions on the dials, achieve program, aperture, shutter priority and full manual modes. The dials have the right amount of tactile feel (though the lens’ aperture rings are a bit too loose and easily knocked off); I’m pleased to see there’s a big distance between A on the shutter speed dial ad the neighbouring settings to prevent accidental dislodgement. Similarly, exposure compensation now runs +/- 3EV. A hotshoe, small pop-up flash (which can be tilted backwards to bounce, providing you don’t need much light) and EVF with eye sensor complete the top plate.

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The EVF is the 2.5-million dot OLED unit from the X100s, with 100% coverage and 23mm of eye point – very comfortable for spectacle wearers, of decent magnification (not as large as the E-M1, though I suspect it’s the same part made by Epson). I could never quite find the right setting for it – though perfectly fine indoors, it got washed out easily in daylight even at maximum brightness and lacks a dynamic/ auto setting. It does have configurable levels of information, and is of sufficiently high resolution that manual focusing is easy even without resorting to any of the focusing aids. With the continual improvement in EVFs and their ability to accurately preview colour, exposure and selectively magnify areas of the frame, the argument for a traditional viewfinder gets weaker and weaker every day; especially if it’s a dark, low-magnification one. There’s also a diopter adjustment and eye sensor to switch automatically between the LCD and viewfinder; it’s also possible to review images in the finder, something which is extremely useful in daylight and sadly lacking from either of the OM-Ds.

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Though Fuji has significantly improved the menu system, I found it – the ‘electronic’ part of the camera – still to be my main source of my frustration. There were some aspects of control I loved, such as the Q-button and ability to change major settings directly from that screen, and the configurability of the buttons – and others that drove me absolutely mad. For example, in the aforementioned Q-menu, the command dial has the opposite effect to what you’d expect – turning left increases the value, and turning right decreases it. This seems small but is so counterintuitive that I continuously found myself fumbling. Surely there could be a custom function controlling the rotation direction of the dial? On top of that, there are multiple places to set things in the menus; sometimes it’s not clear whether the setting will ‘stick’ or not. And on top of that, other settings are buried in illogical positions – image review is under ‘Screen Set-Up’, for example.

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Quite simply, two things need to be done: firstly, group the functions into more logical sets; secondly, remember the last used cursor position so we don’t have to hunt through eight pages of menus to find the option we were looking for. Better yet, have a ‘My Menu’ tab to allow the user to save frequently accessed options – or going one better, allow the Q menu to be configurable with any menu item. There’s one last fly in the ointment: be very careful if you’re trying to save a set of custom parameters; if you hit the wrong thing, it’ll reset all of your choices to one of the existing presets, and you’ll have to begin again. ‘Save current’ should be the default choice, not ‘apply preset’.

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I had the opportunity to use the 18-55/2.8-4 and 60/2.4 lenses with the camera; both are optically very good, with the 60mm being excellent. The 18-55 has slightly soft corners that require stopping down a little to achieve optimal performance. It’s not much larger than competing APS-C kit lenses, but a stop faster at both ends, significantly better optically, and equipped with stabilization (of low to moderate effectiveness; I saw  some evidence of double images/ “VR bounce” at shutter speeds in the 1/60-1/100s region). On both lenses, I found the aperture rings to be too loose and accidentally moved; ideally they need a lock button to push before rotating, or stiffer detents. The same goes for the switches: the travel isn’t that much, and the detents aren’t that stiff, which makes them easy to accidentally knock out of position. That said, of all of the new mirrorless systems, Fuji has the most sensible and interesting lens lineup; it has to, since other than Zeiss, there aren’t as many options as M4/3 (which arguably is full of a lot of consumer zooms anyway). It’s also the only one with physical aperture rings, and that deserves applause.

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You’ll have noticed my continual references to (and use of) the E-M5 and E-M1 throughout this review; Fuji have admitted that they viewed these cameras as their main competitors, and it is of course the system I’m most familiar with – and which would be my natural choice under the situations for which I’d use the X-E2. Aside from the NEX-6 and 5R, they’re also the only mirrorless cameras with PDAF on sensor, too. I’d say the OM-Ds have the advantage when it comes to lens selection; however, the Fuji sensor in the X100s is definitely a notch above the M4/3 cameras. There’s not that much to choose between them in size or price, either; though arguably the Olympus 12-40/2.8 is about the same size as the 18-55/2.8-4 and is of significantly higher spec; the X-E2 itself lacks weather sealing.

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Bearing in mind that the camera I used was not final, I’m hoping that Fuji will do something to the firmware to address two issues: general lagginess in operation, and JPEG output. (Despite this, it was still slightly faster than the X-E1.) I’ll of course reserve judgement until I get to handle a final camera. However, my biggest concern still remains around workflow: until we have decent Adobe support for the X-Trans array, Fuji are going to be crippled in the image quality department – unless you shoot JPEG, which rather defeats the point of buying a new camera or system on the basis of image quality anyway. All in all though, the X-E2 is a solid upgrade from the X-E1 and lower spec X-mount cameras and quite possibly the best X-mount camera yet; one hopes that Fuji will fix the shutter button, and continue their track record of useful firmware updates to address some of the operational speed issues. MT

Coda: Since writing, Sony has announced the A7 and A7R full frame mirrorless cameras; I took some heat over the last two days for not being gushingly full of praise. They come at a price point that’s higher than anything else for the moment, but which will still put pressure on existing mirrorless. Nothing is perfect, not even the cameras I actually buy; that’s because you have a fixed product designed for a ‘general’ type of user, not one specific one. So: if a system works for you, great; use it, ignore what everybody else thinks, and focus on making images. If not, then keep looking. Remember, photography is about photographs, not cameras.

Thank you to Fujifilm Malaysia for providing the opportunity.

The Fujifilm X-E2 is available to preorder here from B&H.

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Comments

  1. Hi Ming. Tks very much for great preview. I have 02 slection of mft camera now: Oly-EM1 and this Fuji EX2. I’m not asking you which one is better, but i really want to know which lens brand is superior? And please name some lens models you like best ( between the Olympus lens and Fuji lens only.)
    I’m eager to have your comment about this.
    Tks very much.

  2. May I know how much it cost in China?

  3. Des Kodur says:

    Ming

    You are mistaken stating that both Olympus models do not have viewfinder based review capability, (if I read that section correctly).
    For me, it is a very useful and welcome feature of these cameras.

    • I just recently discovered that they do by accident – you have to hold the camera to your eye while hitting play. Not the easiest thing to manage ergonomically, but helpful in very bright sun.

      • Joel Venable says:

        Definitely not one of the most well thought out features on the Olympus cameras. My preferred shooting method with the OM-D is having the eye sensor off and using the EVF. However, when I push the play button, the playback switches to the LCD even though I told it to do no such thing. I can switch it back manually with another press of the viewfinder button…

  4. HI Ming ,
    congratulations for your blog, I have been reading your posts for a while and I am really amazed by the quality (and quantity !) of your articles..
    I have one simple question regarding the X-E2 : What’s your opinion regarding the image quality at high iso of the X-E2 Vs OMD Em1 ? I did’nt find any seriuos evaluation regarding this argument on the web. thanks in advance !
    antonio

    • I haven’t used a final production X-E2, so I can’t say.

    • +1 I have this same question, as the Fuji and Oly EM1 are two cameras I’m considering. I’m pretty sure that the Fuji is going to be great in low light and high ISO based on most of the reviews I’ve read. I’m most curious about the EM1, with its smaller sensor. That’s the one thing that gives me pause. I’m currently an APSC owner now (an old Canon) and am thinking of changing systems. I love the way Fujis handle, but the lens selection is still a bit light. M43 has an incredible selection of lenses and camera styles, so I’m hoping that the EM1 will be a good concert and wedding camera. I’m sure at low ISO and good light, it can deliver great quality. Hopefully, Ming will provide some detail once he gets a production Fuji and has some more time with the EM1.

      • The E-M1 is good up to 3200, 6400 in a pinch. I’d put the same limits on the Fuji X100s, which shares a sensor with the X-E2 (haven’t used a final production X-E2 yet). That said: you gain a considerable advantage from the E-M1′s stabiliser, plus speed all around, the lens selection, and weather sealing…

        • Thanks Ming. I suspect that the EM1, even at M43, will be a considerable step up from my old APSC Rebel XSi in low light/high ISO, and virtually every other regard. I’m trying not to go the FF 5DM3 route because I really love the smaller lighter body and lenses, the serious reduction in cost of system ownership, and the sense that as big as Canon is, that mirror less is the future, and perhaps most importantly for me, that the EM1 will just be more fun to shoot.

          • Oh, definitely. It’s very nearly on par with the current generation of APSC cameras, but the small difference is more than made up for by the stabilizer.

            • Hi guys, a week ago I got the “old” XE 1. Absolute amazing camera, nightshots at 3 200 ISO in superb quality, super sharp, no noise. Better than my Nikon DSLR 5100!!

              OOC jepgs are as good as many people comment – and I have not adjusted the camera yet to my liking, I guess I can improve significantly although the IQ already beats everything I am used to in the past.

              The “slow AF problem” probably does exist on the web and in the mind of many people, I experienced hardly any difference towards the Nikon. I never used AF tracking, always single spot AF (the old way), after a few hundred shots you know how the camera behaves and you get 90+ % clean shots in focus.

              BR
              Heiner

  5. Good honest review, refreshing.

    Ming, I wonder if you have a view on the overall hype surrounding the Fuji X cameras? There are a lot of (pretty decent) photographers spewing superlatives non-stop about the XT sensor, but they can never quite articulate exactly what it is they find so good about the output.

    From a brief time with the X-E2 this weekend shooting alongside the E-M5 I can see a difference between 2 photos pretty much every time even at 900px. The Fuji files seem a little creamier, brighter, and more 3D-like. But… I don’t think it is significant enough for me to tell if I were to judge individually on a shot-by-shot basis which many Fuji guys claim they would be able to do.

    I wonder if a lot of this ‘look & feel’ is down to post processing in-camera, as, to a certain degree one can achieve a more smooth look with competing cameras by using a little bit of noise reduction, bumping white levels, warming the image etc.

    It is very easy to be swayed by hype in general, be it Fuji X-Trans or Full frame, which can leave you (well me) feeling that you are missing out on something, even if in reality, you’re not.

    • I don’t feel like I am missing out on anything. This ‘creaminess’ looks to me like smear at the pixel level; fine detail and sharp edges aren’t well defined at all. It could be down to the way current demosaicing algorithms handle the XT files, but I’ve seen full-size files from respected photographers claiming to use the best available tools – C1/ silkypix – and frankly…they aren’t much better.

    • Sorry Ming if I don’t agree. I shoot only jepgs on the X E 1 with 18-55 mm lens: the images are sharp, nearly “scary sharp”, I can zoom in as much as I want, they don’t get “digital pixely”.

      For me the images have a certain beauty I have never ecperienced myself in photography and have rarely seen in magazines or the web. The colors and the WB are just right. Yesterday I took some time playing with settings and I even got this “kodachrome” look!! for 95 % of all situations I use standard settings.

      My Nikon 5 100 is “soft” compared to this, only with the 35 mm f 1.8 it can compete (comes out second).

      At the moment I use only jepgs without any post processing and view on a 50 inch plasma.

      BR
      Heiner, still amazed about his new toy

      • That may be true with X-E1, but my X-E2 is very soft, especially for portraits. It seems a lot of the low noise fanfare is just basic NR applied to JPEGS, in many cases it’s too much.

        • I couldn’t find any way to turn it off completely either; even NR off still has traces of NR in the raw files (now that ACR can read them). I hope this is something limited to the preproduction models…

  6. Wow! From your review it sounds like you weren’t that thrilled with the camera but based on the pictures you produced it looks like a winner. Great images. Would you say there is more of a lower rate of “keepers” as compared to the OMD system rather than the best images from the Fuji system not stacking up to the best of Olympus?

    • They don’t satisfy me when taken into consideration as a whole; the overall image quality is pretty poor. Enlargement size would be smaller than the E-M1, let alone the GR. And yes, the keeper rate was dire – about 3%.

      • People seem split so much by the Fujis – with one camp saying they have out of this world image quality, and another saying it isn’t all that at all. I’ve not seen such a split over one camera – why do you think this is Ming?

        • I have absolutely no idea. Personally, I’m not impressed. But I will give them one thing: at high magnifications, the rendering looks very much like film, which I’ve not seen from any other digital. Perhaps it’s something to do with this.

          • There is something very strange about the whole Fuji X business. The cameras are both infuriatingly compromised and yet get tantalisingly close to getting it so right. I am a micro four thirds user but last year added an X-E1 out of frustration at shutter shock problems with my E-M5 and a general feeling that the image quality was still lagging somewhat behind what I really wanted from my cameras. To be honest, the X-E1 is a bit rubbish. It is slow, stilted, has all sorts of control issues, and that much mentioned image quality is largely elusive – unless, that is, you can find a RAW converter to actually do some justice to the potential of the sensor. Forget Adobe RAW. It produces hopelessly soft conversions that just convert to water colour paintings if you try to sharpen them up. Forget C1. Forget Silkypix. If you want to see what these Fuji’s can actually do, I’m afraid you have to buy a Mac. Aperture does a pretty decent job, revealing detail and punch which eludes any Adobe workflow. Raw Photo Processor does a decent job too but you have to battle through a dreadful interface. Rawker is a very simple little converter which produces nice conversions, but no longer in development. If this doesn’t sound like a reason for buying into the Fuji philosophy, I would largely agree were it not for two more options with decent interfaces which produce results which get most of the way one would hope for in unearthing the potential of the sensor. These two converters are PhotoNinja and the one which I ended up paying for and now use for all my Fuji conversions, Iridient Developer. Nothing I’ve got out of my E-M5 has got anywhere close to the best I can do from my X-E1 with a decent lens fitted and with Iridient performing the conversions. I am not completely convinced about the 18-55 zoom but there is no doubt at all that the 35mm f1.4 and 14mm lenses are worth the price of admission IF you can find a way to extract a finished image to do them justice.

            I’ve now sold the X-E1 because I disliked using it so much but still have my lenses and am steeling myself to buy an X-T1 which I hope will be slick enough in its operation to convert me properly into being a more enthusiastic Fuji user. Someone at Fuji might actually have known what they were doing with this X-trans stuff, but no-one there seems to have given any thought about how to convert that innovative thinking in the sensor engineering into the photographic output!

            Martin

  7. lol..I’m not sure if they ever give you another camera to review man…basically XE2 is crap

    • Well, I’m not bothered as I don’t make a living reviewing cameras.

    • Hi Aref,

      the craps sells good: according to a newspaer article I read today Fujifilm is selling the X cameras very well, otherwise the big guys Nikon and Canon are struggling.
      I got the XE 1 and I am extremely happly with it, outperforms my D 5 100 in IQ by a margin.

      But everybody has a differten style and taste, similar to cars.

      BR
      Heiner

  8. Well, I’m using Fuji X since the first X100, going over to the X-Pro1. My main RAW-tools are based on Aperture and plug-ins like DxO, not LR that I dislike for many reasons.

    Being a very technical person myself, over all this time I have been comparing the X-Pro1′s output with many other cameras, including FF DSLR’s and Leica. To be honest, there are not a lot coming close and certainly not with the HQ primes like the XF14mm, 23mm & 35mm Fujifilm released. I don’t need dozens of zooms that don’t interest me. FF-cameras may have some advantage over the DOF control (bokeh), but that’s it. Without being a pro, I have even been using the X-Pro1 in studio-context was surprised how well it behaved aside of top notch FF DSLR’s. The Fuji’s produce a kind of film-alike color and appearance, that I like very much.

    I respect anyone’s choice for the Olympus OM-D’s, but I still can’t see in them a match for the Fuji’s, unless maybe its excellent AF capabilities. Fuji should have done a better job in this area, but also the first waves of 4/3 cameras weren’t exactly famous for a good AF-behavior. We may expect that Fuji will master this better in next generations, that’s the way it’s always going and if I was Fuji, I would blow all competition away with the next X-Pro2.

    Ming: I really respect you and your blog a lot, but I do not understand your comments about the Fuji’s buttons, ergonomics and even menus, it’s looking for something to be wrong while it isn’t at all. If you compare the layout with the Olympus OM-D’s, even the overall form factor, for me everything is really a fair bit too small, too far from being ergonomic, this is just an advanced compact of the smartphone-age – not to mention that 4/3 is merely a video ratio and these sensors are still quite a bit smaller than APS/C effecting in again less DOF control versus FF. I also don’t experience with the OM-D’s any true camera control & feeling like the oldtimers of my generation were used to… something I still have with my X-Pro1 and that can never bring me back to the modern ranges of DSLR’s.

    You see how different opinions can be and I’m sure I can represent by this reply the view of many thousands of advanced and experienced Fuji X photographers, sorry, I think you were too subjective about this X-E2 but I admit it is sometimes difficult not to be so if you like something else so much.

    • Why would I waste billable time reviewing several Fujis to ‘find fault’? I have better things to do. I tried the cameras with genuine interest and was disappointed, and wasted my own time in doing so. I am not a review blog, I am a commercial photographer, so my time is actually valuable and I actually need to make pictures that would pass personal and client approval. These would not, and I would be/ was frustrated with the ergonomics; no good camera takes a week to acclimatise to! We can of course agree to disagree, but frankly, I think my results with my choice of system speak for themselves.

      • Again, I wrote my comment in respect. It didn’t take me a week to get used to the Fuji X-system, even contrary, it was like coming home after a long time. The menu system… and others, after about 2.5 year know I really don’t know where I should complain about, there are not hundreds of silly options, filters and other nice to have that complicated many other menu systems, but only settings that only appeal to a true photographer. Let me put it as such… I’m not what you call a ‘commercial photographer’, but I use my X-system in the sideline of my profession and I’m an advanced photographer in any other free time since 36 year now. No, I don’t like the Olympus or Panasonic ergonomics, neither could Sony or even Canon ever fascinate me with what they find how a camera should work. Nikon DSLR’s… I can still accept their operational philosophies, certainly on the pro-line cameras, but regret they abandoned the kind of feeling that a FM would give you, and even the Df is not giving you this back.

        • The DF is a disaster. Don’t get me started: the designers had schizophrenia and couldn’t decide if it should be a film-style camera or a digital one.

          It wasn’t my first time out with the X system. I wanted to like it because the lenses made so much sense; I forced myself to shoot with it for extended periods of time, which is generally a waste of time for me because I’ve got plenty of other things on my plate. It doesn’t take me long to get used to a new camera; a few hours at most usually. I’ve shot and reviewed hundreds of the things in my current line and my previous job as photo magazine editor. But the Fujis just leave me frustrated, first with the illogical position of items in the menu, and then with the disappointing image quality. I keep wishing I’d used something else instead, especially when the image is one that matters.

    • Hi Dirk,

      your comment could be written by me as I had exactly the same experience.
      Last weekend a friend of my son who is a ambitious amateur visted us and he was delighted by the controlls and IQ of the jepgs.

      I bought the XE 1: the AF is NOT on spot and actually the worst of all my cameras, maybe I should have waited and invest a bit more and bought the XE 2. – A big truck has more HP than a Porsche!

      Without keeping statistics I estimate to miss 10-30% of all shots, a bit more than my DSLR.

      If I go to my daughters school sport event I take a DSLR. In low light (dinner in a restaurant) the IQ of the XE 1 without using the flash is just amazing.

      Enjoy Heiner

  9. Hello,
    You have to flash the lenses too to use the newer AF system. My 18-55 with the X-E2 has the newest lens firmware and i find the AF nice and fast….

  10. Hi Ming: did you ever get your hands on an X100s or review? Any plans? Would love your thoughts! I just got a rental but am now thinking that it is slow enough that I might just get an old Leica M3 and be happier! ;)

  11. Hi Ming… Thanks for the review. Can you clarify what you mean when you say … “There is a ‘high performance mode’ buried in the menus that increases focusing speed slightly, but it appears to freeze the live view in order to do so – this is a big no-no in my book because it means you have no visibility of critical action, making it very difficult to time shots. There’s also a pre-AF function that continually drives the lens…”

    Even the Fuji X-E2 press releases mention a High Performance mode. Are you able to verify please if this is as you suggest different from the pre-AF function and if so, where the High Performance mode might be activated? I’ve searched through my manual, menus and Google (hence came across your blog) and cannot seem to find any High Performance mode on the X-E2. Apologies if I am missing the obvious. – Andrew

    • Sorry, the camera was returned a long, long time ago. It’s simply impossible to remember the menus of every camera I’ve used, especially when a lot of them are both complex and illogical. I suggest you read the manual…

    • Go to set up 2> open power management> high performance is the second item in the subfolder.turn on or off.

  12. Wow! You sound like you hate Fuji camera’s in general and you love Olympus. You give it some praises but there is always a “but”. Just an observation. Pretty nice pics I must say.

  13. I am looking for a good tutorial or youtube (for a friend that I recommended buy this camera) …. that shows how to use thios camera in its most basic auto modes … has anyone any good suggestions?

Trackbacks

  1. […] The Fujifilm X-E2 is a welcome update to last year's popular X-E1. The camera takes the innards of the X100s and puts them in an X-mount body; it isn't the X-Pro2 that a lot of users were hoping fo…  […]

  2. […] Rico’s X-Pert Corner! / ephotozine / dpreview / DSLRmagazine (Spanish) / mingthein / photoskala (German) / pocket-lint / dphotographer […]

  3. […] The Fujifilm X-E2 is a welcome update to last year’s popular X-E1. The camera takes the innards of the X100s and puts them in an X-mount body; it isn’t the X-Pro2 that a lot of users were hoping for, but it’s a significant enough update – for those who had issues with AF speed at least – to warrant serious consideration. In fact, I was sent a list of 61 improvements the X-E2 carries; some new to the camera, some inherited from the X-M1 and others from the X100s. I personally have had a rather inconsistent experience with Fujifilm products; on one hand, I absolutely love their films – Acros is my mainstay in all formats – but was left highly expectant and then disappointed by several cameras, first the original X100, then the X-Pro1, the XF1 and finally the X20. These are cameras I wanted to love, but found lacking in several areas; ultimately, I landed up with M4/3 as my compact system choice due to maturity of cameras and lenses. Many have asked why I don’t seriously consider the X system; I was offered a pre-production prototype by Fujifilm Malaysia, and I cleared a few days in the schedule to seriously revisit the system  […]

  4. […] The Fujifilm X-E2 is a welcome update to last year's popular X-E1. The camera takes the innards of the X100s and puts them in an X-mount body; it isn't the X-Pro2 that a lot of users were hoping fo…  […]

  5. […] The Fujifilm X-E2 is a welcome update to last year's popular X-E1. The camera takes the innards of the X100s and puts them in an X-mount body; it isn't the X-Pro2 that a lot of users were hoping fo…  […]

  6. […] The Fujifilm X-E2 is a welcome update to last year’s popular X-E1. The camera takes the innards of the X100s and puts them in an X-mount body; it isn’t the X-Pro2 that a lot of users were hoping for, but it’s a significant enough update – for those who had issues with AF speed at least – to warrant serious consideration. In fact, I was sent a list of 61 improvements the X-E2 carries; some new to the camera, some inherited from the X-M1 and others from the X100s. I personally have had a rather inconsistent experience with Fujifilm products; on one hand, I absolutely love their films – Acros is my mainstay in all formats – but was left highly expectant and then disappointed by several cameras, first the original X100, then the X-Pro1, the XF1 and finally the X20. These are cameras I wanted to love, but found lacking in several areas; ultimately, I landed up with M4/3 as my compact system choice due to maturity of cameras and lenses. Many have asked why I don’t seriously consider the X system; I was offered a pre-production prototype by Fujifilm Malaysia, and I cleared a few days in the schedule to seriously revisit the system.  […]

  7. […] hier gibt es eine interessante Vorschau auf die X-E2 Preview: The 2013 Fujifilm X-E2 […]

  8. […] The Fujifilm X-E2 is a welcome update to last year's popular X-E1. The camera takes the innards of the X100s and puts them in an X-mount body; it isn't the X-Pro2 that a lot of users were hoping fo…  […]

  9. […] OM-D E-M1. Едно много интересно ревю на известния фотограф Ming Thein за този уникален […]

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