Inspirations from older cameras: The Panasonic LX3

The Panasonic LX3 was one of what I like to think of as a matured, serious compact – it had a larger sensor with fewer pixels for better dynamic range and low light performance (notice I said ‘better’, not ‘good’). It had a fast and sharp 24-72/2-2.8 equivalent, with variable aspect ratios on a switch; one of the downsides of this piece of glass was the price and unpocketability thanks to the protruding lens barrel, but it was worth it. Great dynamic range for a compact, too, though color accuracy could be somewhat wanting at times.

Enjoy! All images can be clicked on for larger versions, or EXIF information. MT

P1000637 copy
Sunset

P1000184 copy
Distorted reality

P1000647 copy
Internal facade

P1000769 copy
Silhouettes

P1000702 copy
Under the awning

P1000354 copy
Look up

P1000161 copy
Pastel interior

P1000331 copy
Puddle

P1010272 copy
Traffic

P1010415 copy
Opposites

P1000413 copy
Untitled

P1000142 copy
Pipework

P1010047bw copy
Ouch

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Enter the August 2012 competition: Compact Challenge – here!

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Comments

  1. Really loving this series on older cameras, Ming. Again, superb images.

    Just a thought: you should include your product shot of the camera in question, if you still have it. it’d be great to see your take on how the camera should be presented.

  2. Hi Ming,

    I have been a big fan of LX3, not because it was the best camera ever made, but because it started me off on photography.
    I started taking photography seriously after LX3 happened to me.
    Before this, i had always been acasual snapshooter. With this camera, i started clicking a lot
    of pictures. I started carrying it with me whenever i travelled, something that was hardly a priority before.

    Paradoxically, by using this camera so much, i learnt that the camera is not important. Like a paint brush is not important. Like a pen is not important.

    Here’s my LX3 set on Flickr:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/agnihot/sets/72157619540388908/

    anurag

  3. Ciao Ming, great shots, beautiful color , am impressed with the results of this camera. My fav is ‘under the awning”.

  4. Beautiful Pictures!

  5. russelldawkins says:

    When I click on the photos, I am sent to Flickr, but for some reason everything is so small I can barely read the text – and the photos are smaller than they are in your email, and cannot be enlarged. ??? Russell

  6. Beautiful set, Ming!

Trackbacks

  1. [...] The Panasonic LX3 was one of what I like to think of as a matured, serious compact – it had a larger sensor with fewer pixels for better dynamic range and low light performance (notice I said ‘better’, not ‘good’). It had a fast and sharp 24-72/2-2.8 equivalent, with variable aspect ratios on a switch; one of the downsides of this piece of glass was the price and unpocketability thanks to the protruding lens barrel, but it was worth it. Great dynamic range for a compact, too, though color accuracy could be somewhat wanting at times.  [...]

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